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dracula_prince_of_darkness


Dracula: Prince of Darkness is a 1966 British horror film directed by Terence Fisher for Hammer Studios. Starring Christopher Lee as Count Dracula, Barbara Shelley, Andrew Keir, Francis Matthews, Suzan Farmer, and Charles ‘Bud’ Tingwell.  The film was photographed in Techniscope by Michael Reed, designed by Bernard Robinson and scored by James Bernard.

Trivia:

  • Christopher Lee found the lines given to this character so awful that he chose to play it silent.
  • Filmed back-to-back with Rasputin: The Mad Monk (1966), using many of the same cast members and sets.
  • According to the DVD commentary by Barbara Shelley and Suzan Farmer, all of Barbara Shelley’s screams were dubbed over by Suzan Farmer.
  • Originally shown (in London) in a double billing with The Plague of the Zombies (1966).
  • In the scene where Dracula finally wakes up (his “resurrection” in his coffin), to the crash of thunder and a flash of lightning, he originally took, as probably anyone would, a full FOUR frames (one sixth of a second) to completely open his eyes. In the final cutting stages, an assistant editor had the idea of removing those four frames – effectively a “jump cut” – to have Dracula’s eyes open in an even more shocking ONE frame. However, the editor, Chris Barnes, had already finalized the edit for that reel – so the clever cut was never incorporated!
  • In the scene where Dracula is being “resurrected” from a coffin into which his ashes have been spread, from blood dripping down from a poor victim (provided by Klove) Dracula is made to “manifest himself” over a period of about a minute. This was achieved by overlapping “dissolves” of a series of twelve locked-down camera shots, involving first the ashes, then a skeleton, then some body-fat on the skeleton, etc., along with swirling mist, till we finally perceive the full form of Dracula. He doesn’t appear fully dressed as is usually the case – the shot moves to outside the coffin and a bare arm reaches out. The vampire’s clothes were seen in earlier scenes awaiting his return.
  • plague of zombies

    plague_of_zombies_poster (1966)

    The Plague of the Zombies (1966) Hammer Horror film directed by John Gilling. It stars André Morell, John Carson, Jacqueline Pearce, Brook Williams and Michael Ripper. The film is notable for its seminal imagery, which influenced many films in the zombie genre, and its themes of colonialism, exploitation and tyranny.

    Trivia:

  • Filmed back-to-back with The Reptile (1966), using many of the same sets, most noticeably the main village set on the back lot at Bray Studios.
  • Diane Clare’s voice is dubbed in this movie.
  • Originally shown (in London) in a double billing with Dracula: Prince of Darkness (1966).
  • One Million Years B.C. released December 30, 1966

    one million years b.c.

    One Million Years B.C. is a 1966 (released in the United States in 1967) adventure film/fantasy film starring Raquel Welch set – loosely – in the time of cavemen. The film was made by UK’s Hammer Film Productions, and was a remake of the 1940 Hollywood film One Million B.C., and it re-creates many of the scenes of that film (such as an allosaurus attacking a tree full of children). It is marketed with the taglines “Travel back through time and space to the edge of man’s beginnings…discover a savage world whose only law was lust!” and “This is the way it was.”

    Like the original film, this remake is largely ahistorical. It portrays dinosaurs and humans living together, whereas, according to the Geologic time scale the last dinosaurs became extinct roughly 65 million years BC, and homo sapiens (modern humans) did not exist until about 200,000 years BC. Harryhausen has stated in a commentary of the unfinished film, Creation, shown on the King Kong 1933 DVD, that he did not make One Million Years B.C. for “professors” who in his opinion “probably don’t go to see these kinds of movies anyway.”

    raquel welch

    Raquel Welch in One Million Years B.C.

    Trivia:

  • As the Shell People are attacked by a giant turtle, the women call it “Achelon” which is the real scientific name for the animal.
  • Robert Brown (Akhoba) wears makeup identical to that worn by Lon Chaney Jr. wore in the same role in the 1940 version (One Million B.C. (1940)).
  • The exterior scenes were filmed in the Canary Islands in the middle of winter.
  • This was Hammer’s 100th production.
  • Raquel Welch was dubbed by Nikki Van der Zyl.
  • Countess Dracula released January 31, 1971

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    Countess Dracula is a 1971 Hammer horror film based on the legends surrounding the “Blood Countess” Elizabeth Báthory. It is in many ways atypical of Hammer’s canon, but can be considered related to that studio’s Karnstein Trilogy attempting to broaden Hammer’s output from Dracula and Frankenstein sequels.

    [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h0UKg47jegw]

    The film was produced by Alexander Paal and directed by Peter Sasdy, Hungarian émigrés working in England. The original music score was composed by Harry Robertson.

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    Ingrid Pitt reprised her role as Countess Elizabeth on the 1998 Cradle of Filth album, Cruelty and the Beast.

    Trivia:

    • Ingrid Pitt’s voice was dubbed. Supposedly, she was so furious at director Peter Sasdy that she vowed never to speak to him again.
    • Countess Dracula was based on Hungarian Countess Erzsebet (our modern day “Elizabeth”) Bathory who lived from 1560 to 1614. Countess Bathory was allegedly responsible for the deaths of approximately 600 virgin girls, all of which involved torture and gruesome methods of killing. Her atrocities are mostly speculation. She is credited for influencing our modern day concept of Dracula as an entity depending on human blood for youth and vitality.

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    • The picture that appears behind the opening credits is an 1896 painting by Hungarian artist Istvan Csok. It shows the real Countess Bathory enjoying the torture of some young women by her servants. In an inner courtyard of one of her castles, the naked girls are being drenched with water and allowed to freeze to death in the snow.
    • Ingrid Pitt replaced Diana Rigg who turned the role down.
    • Although cuts were requested by the BBFC (and the film remains listed as cut on their website) the edits were never made following an appeal by Hammer to chief censor Stephen Murphy.

    Ingrid Pitt

    Dracula Has Risen from the Grave is a 1968 British horror film directed by Freddie Francis for Hammer Films. It stars Christopher Lee as Count Dracula, with support from Rupert Davies, Veronica Carlson, Barry Andrews, Barbara Ewing, Ewan Hooper and Michael Ripper.

    The world of the film is arguably far darker and more ambiguous than the world created by director Terence Fisher for the previous three films in the Dracula series.

    Dracula Has Risen from the Grave is the Sequel to “Prince of Darkness” (1966).

    Veronica Carlson and Christopher Lee

    Directed by Freddie Francis

    Writer – John Elder

    Producer – Aida Young

    Cast
    Christopher Lee … Dracula
    Rupert Davies … Monsignor Ernest Mueller
    Veronica Carlson … Maria Mueller
    Barbara Ewing … Zena
    Barry Andrews … Paul
    Ewan Hooper … Priest
    Marion Mathie … Anna Mueller
    Michael Ripper … Max
    John D. Collins … Student
    George A. Cooper … Landlord
    Chris Cunningham … Farmer
    Norman Bacon … Mute Boy

    The Story: (Spoiler Alert!!)

    A year has passed since the demise of Dracula, buried under the ice in the river that flows past his castle. Ernst Mueller [Rupert Davies], monsignor of the monastery at Kleinberg, has decided to visit the village to see that all is well. What he finds is appalling. The village priest [Ewan Hooper] has become an alcoholic. The villagers will not attend Sunday Mass because the shadow of Dracula’s castle touches the church during the evening hours. The Monsignor decides to exorcise the castle and prove to the villagers that the evil is gone. He and the priest climb the hill to the castle, but the priest chickens out halfway. The Monsignor continues alone to the castle door where he performs his exorcism and seals the castle door with a large cross. The priest, in the meantime, is taking swigs from his hipflask. He stumbles over a cliff, cuts his head, lands on the river ice, causing it to crack open just above Dracula’s body. The priest’s blood drips through the cracked ice, flowing into Dracula’s mouth, and Dracula is thus resurrected.

    Veronica Carlson

    Barred from his castle by the cross on the door, Dracula [Christopher Lee] must now find other lodgings. He enslaves the priest, forcing him to dig up a new coffin for him. He also forces him to reveal who is responsible for the exorcism. The coffin is loaded onto a funeral coach, and the priest and Dracula head toward Kleinberg. His exorcism finished, the Monsignor also returns to Kleinberg where he lives with his brother’s widow Anna [Marion Mathe] and his niece Maria [Veronica Carlson]. It is Maria’s birthday, and a dinner party is planned for her. Tonight, Maria will introduce her boyfriend Paul [Barry Anderson], who she has been climbing over the rooftops to meet secretly) to her family. Paul works as a baker at the Johann Cafe and engages in scholarly studies during his spare time. Scared to meet Maria’s family for the first time, Paul’s plight is not helped when his friends at the cafe spill beer down his shirt. Still, all goes well at the dinner until Paul, in a fit of truthfulness, admits to the Monsignor that he is an atheist. Paul returns to the cafe, downs 3 glasses of Schnapps, and passes out. The waitress Xena [Barbara Ewing] carries him up to bed just as Maria enters through a window.

    On her way home, Xena is attacked by Dracula. With Xena’s help, Dracula and his coffin are moved into a storage room in the cafe cellar, and the priest takes a room at the cafe. The next evening, when Maria drops by the cafe to see Paul, Xena leads her into the bakery, covers her head with a bag, and takes her to see Dracula. Maria escapes, however, when Paul comes looking for her, and she tells of being attacked by a man “with burning eyes.” Angry at the failed attempt, Dracula kills Xena and orders the priest to destroy her in the furnace fire. Later that night, Dracula comes to Maria’s bedside and drinks from her. He returns the next night but, just as he prepares to drink from her, the Monsignor enters the room. Dracula sees the cross in the Monsignor’s hand and leaps from the window. The Monsignor attempts to follow but is knocked out by the priest. As the Monsignor lies dying, he sends for Paul and tells him what he must do to save Maria. Paul finds Dracula’s coffin and drives a stake through his heart but, because neither he nor the priest can pray to God, Dracula succeeds in removing the stake. He escapes, summons Maria and, together with the priest, they return to Dracula’s castle. Paul gets a horse and follows.

    Upon reaching the castle, Dracula forces Maria to remove the cross from the castle door. As she throws it down the cliff, Paul arrives. He and Dracula battle. They both fall off the porch. Paul catches a branch on the way down but Dracula falls to the ground where he is impaled upon the cross just tossed away by Maria. As the priest recites the Pater Noster, Dracula turns to dust.

    Production Info:

    This was the first of the Hammer Dracula films to be shot at Elstree Studios in London. Notably missing are the approach road, coach path and moat seen in front of Castle Dracula in 1958’s Dracula and 1966’s Dracula: Prince of Darkness. Those films were made at Bray Studios.

    The film was photographed by Arthur Grant using colored filters belonging to director Freddie Francis, also a cameraman by trade, who used them when photographing The Innocents (1961). Whenever Dracula (or his castle) is in a scene, the frame edges are tinged crimson, amber and yellow.

    In Australia, the film was the first Hammer Dracula to be passed by the censors; the previous films Dracula (1958) and Dracula: Prince of Darkness (1966) were banned. The film was slightly censored and ran for a three-week season at Sydney’s Capitol theatre in January 1970. In the US, the film was rated G. ……… Source(s) IMDB, Wikipedia

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    The Horror of Frankenstein is a 1970 British horror film by Hammer Film Productions that is both a semi-parody and remake of the 1957 film The Curse of Frankenstein. It was produced and directed by Jimmy Sangster, starring Ralph Bates, Kate O’Mara, Veronica Carlson and David Prowse as the monster. The original music score was composed by Malcolm Williamson.

     

    Baron Victor von Frankenstein, a cold, arrogant and womanizing genius, is angry when his father forbids him to continue his anatomy experiments. He then sabotages his father’s shotgun, killing him as a consequence. Inheriting the family fortune, he uses the money to enter medical school in Vienna, but is forced to return home when he impregnates the daughter of the Dean. There, he sets up his laboratory, starting a series of experiments involving the revival of the dead, eventually building a composite body from human parts, which he then brings to life.

    The Horror of Frankenstein

     

    Kate O'Mara

    Kate O'Mara

    Cast
    Ralph Bates … Victor Frankenstein
    Kate O’Mara … Alys
    Veronica Carlson … Elizabeth Heiss
    Dennis Price … The Graverobber
    Jon Finch … Lt. Henry Becker
    Bernard Archard … Prof. Heiss

     

    Make Up Department
    Tom Smith … makeup supervisor
    Pearl Tipaldi … hair styles supervisor

    Veronica Carlson

    Veronica Carlson

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    Scars of Dracula released November 8, 1970

    Scars of Dracula 1970

    Scars of Dracula is a 1970 British horror film directed by Roy Ward Baker for Hammer Studios.

    It stars Christopher Lee as Count Dracula, alongside Dennis Waterman, Jenny Hanley, Patrick Troughton, and Michael Gwynn. Although disparaged by some critics, the film does restore a few elements of Bram Stoker’s original character: The Count is introduced as an “icily charming host”; he has command over nature; and he is seen scaling the walls of his castle. It also gives Lee more to do and say than any other Hammer Dracula film except its first, 1958’s Horror of Dracula.

    Trivia:

    • Jenny Hanley was dubbed by Nikki Van der Zyl.
    • Dennis Waterman was Hammer’s choice; Roy Ward Baker has said in interviews he thought Waterman was badly miscast.
    • The last feature of Toke Townley
    • Last Hammer horror of Michael Ripper.
    • Scars of Dracula is the first Dracula film to attempt to capture the scene in Bram Stoker’s 1897 novel where the Count actually crawls out and climbs along a wall in a bat-like manner, the only difference being that in the Stoker novel, Dracula climbs down, while in Scars of Dracula he climbs up.
    • This is the second Hammer Dracula film to feature a servant to the count named “Klove” (the first was Dracula: Prince of Darkness, though the role was played by a different actor in each film.

    Cast  
      Christopher Lee … Dracula
      Dennis Waterman … Simon Carlson
      Jenny Hanley … Sarah Framsen
      Christopher Matthews … Paul Carlson
      Patrick Troughton … Klove
      Michael Gwynn … The Priest
      Michael Ripper … Landlord
      Wendy Hamilton … Julie
      Anouska Hempel … Tania
      Delia Lindsay … Alice, burgomaster’s daughter

    Jenny Hanley

    Jenny Hanley

     

    Make Up Department
      Heather Nurse … assistant makeup artist
      Wally Schneiderman … makeup supervisor
      Pearl Tipaldi … hairdresser

       Roger Dicken … special effects

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    Demons of the Mind released November 5, 1972

    Demons of the Mind (1972)

    Demons of the Mind is a 1972 British period horror film, produced by the Hammer studio. It was directed by Peter Sykes and its cinematographer was Arthur Grant. The cast includes Gillian Hills, Robert Hardy, Patrick Magee, Michael Hordern and Shane Briant.

    [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qjgel8Xo9Gc]

    Trivia:

    • Robert Hardy replaced Eric Porter who withdrew from the movie to
      Gillian Hills

      Gillian Hills

      film Hands of the Ripper (1971) which was made simultaneously.

    • Gillian Hills was a last-minute replacement for Marianne Faithfull who was recast due to insurance reasons.
    • The role of Elisabeth was originally intended for famous pop icon Marianne Faithfull.
    • Although the movie was completed in 1971, it sat on a shelf for over a year and was finally released on a double bill with the trashy psycho feature Tower of Evil (1972).
    • The role of Baron Zorn was originally offered to Paul Scofield and James Mason, both of whom turned it down.
    • Shane Briant made his film debut as the tormented Emil.
    • John Atkinson is dubbed.
    • Paul Jones was suggested by the director.

    Yvonne Mitchell

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     when_dinosaurs_ruled_the_earth

    When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth is a 1970 movie starring Victoria Vetri, set in the time of cavemen. The film was made by Britain’s Hammer Films.

    Like several of Hammer’s previous films, such as One Million Years B.C. (1966), the film portrays dinosaurs and humans alongside each other. Directed and scripted by Val Guest, it was based on a treatment by J.G. Ballard, and nominated for an Oscar for its visual effects.

    The special effects are considered a benchmark in stop-motion animation believability, so much so that the film is referenced in the movie Jurassic Park. Stop-motion effects were created by Jim Danforth, assisted by David W. Allen and Roger Dickens.

    The landscapes (Earth during the Quaternary) were filmed in Gran Canaria and Fuerteventura (Canary Islands), in some places as Maspalomas beach, Ansite Mountain, Amurga and Caldera de Tejeda, in others. It was briefly released on DVD as an exclusive from Best Buy with a G-rating, but was later recalled because it was the uncut version and contained nudity. The original is now a collector’s item.

    when dinosaurs ruled the earth poster

    Trivia:

  • Victoria Vetri revealed in a 1984 interview that the U.K. version of the film contains nudity. The nude scenes include her character Sanna making love to Tara (Robin Hawdon) in a cave.
  • A 27-word “caveman language” was devised for this movie, supposedly drawing on Phoenician, Latin, and Sanskrit sources. Some of the key words in this language are: “neecha” is “stop” or “come back”; “zak” is “gone” or “left”; “akita” is “look” or “see”; “neecro” is “bad” or “evil”; “m’kan” is “kill” or “killed”; “mata” is “dead”; “yo kita” is “go”.
  • In March 1971, Warner Brothers cleverly distributed this film in the USA on a double bill with the similarly themed dinosaur film The Valley of Gwangi (1969).
  • Cast:

    Victoria Vetri

    Victoria Vetri

      Victoria Vetri … Sanna
      Robin Hawdon … Tara
      Patrick Allen … Kingsor
      Drewe Henley … Khaku
      Sean Caffrey … Kane
      Magda Konopka … Ulido
      Imogen Hassall … Ayak

    Magda Konopka

    Magda Konopka

     

     

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    The Gorgon released October 18, 1964

    The Gorgon (1964)

    The Gorgon (1964)

     

    The Gorgon is a 1964 British horror film directed by Terence Fisher for Hammer.

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    Buy This Title on DVD

    It stars Peter Cushing, Christopher Lee, Barbara Shelley and Richard Pasco. The film was photographed by Michael Reeves, and designed by Bernard Robinson. For the score James Bernard combined a soprano with a little-known electronic instrument called the Novachord. The film marks one of the few occasions when Hammer turned to Greek mythology for inspiration; this time it is the legend of the Gorgon that is respun for the Hammer audiences.

    Tagline:  A Monster With the Power to Turn Living Screaming Flesh Into Stone!

    Trivia:

    • Prudence Hyman’s snake-filled wig was worked by five wires which were attached to a box that was about 25 feet behind her.
    • Although the UK cinema version was uncut some shots of the Gorgon’s decapitated head were slightly darkened by the BBFC.
    • Actress Barbara Shelley, who played the possessed heroine, Carla Hoffmann, wanted to play the part of the gorgon as well for continuity, and suggested to producer Anthony Nelson Keys that she use a special wig with live green garden snakes woven into it for a more realistic effect. Her idea was rejected by Keys due to budget and time considerations. When Keys saw the abysmal gorgon effects in the finished film, he told Shelley that he should have listened to her suggestion. As Christopher Lee quips, “The only thing wrong with “The Gorgon” is the gorgon!”
    • The name of the Gorgon character is “Megaera”, supposedly taken from mythology. But Megaera (“jealous”) in ancient myth is one of the three Erinyes, or Fates – the goddesses of revenge – not a Gorgon. According to Hesiod, the three Gorgons were Stheno, Euryale, and Medusa.
    • Prudence Hyman was nearly decapitated for real. She was supposed to duck when Lee swung the sword but forgot to do so at the critical moment. The assistant director pushed her aside just in time. The scene was then redone with a dummy.
    • Michael Goodliffe who plays Richard Pasco ‘s father in this film is only 12 years older than Pasco.
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    27 x 40 Movie Poster!

     

     

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