Horror Archives

Warlock released June 2, 1989 (UK)

warlock

Warlock was a 1989 horror film produced by New World Pictures and distributed by Trimark Pictures. It was directed by Steve Miner, written by David Twohy, and produced by Roger Corman. The cast includes Julian Sands, Lori Singer, and Richard E. Grant. The sound track was by Jerry Goldsmith.

The film runs for 103 minutes in color with Dolby sound and in the English language. It received an MPAA rating of R (under-17 restricted). There was a 1993 sequel to this movie called Warlock: The Armageddon and a third film in 1999 called Warlock III: The End of Innocence. Acclaim Entertainment released a video game based on the films for the Super NES and Sega Genesis in 1995. Bluewater Productions also began a Warlock comic book series in 2009.

Trivia:

  • Scene in the theatrical previews indicating that the Warlock was the satanic Messiah was cut some time before video distribution.
  • The film was originally completed in late 1988 and was one of the last films completed by distributor New World Pictures when they filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. The film’s trailer was actually shown before early 1989 theatrical releases. Instead of going direct to video, Warlock was picked up and released in theatres by Trimark Pictures in 1991. It’s box office success lead to a sequel, “Warlock: The Armageddon” in which Trimark also released theatrically.

Frankenhooker released June 1, 1990

Frankenhooker

Frankenhooker is an American black comedy horror film that was released in 1990. Very loosely inspired by Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein, the film was directed by Frank Henenlotter and stars James Lorinz as medical school drop-out Jeffrey Franken and former Penthouse Pet Patty Mullen as the title character (who wears a fatsuit in the beginning of the film).

Trivia:

Beverly Bonner plays “Casey”, a character that appears in Basket Case (1982), Brain Damage (1988), and Basket Case 2 (1990), all also directed by Frank Henenlotter.


The brain with the eye in the beginning of the film is based on the advertisements for The Brain That Wouldn’t Die (1962)

 


The hooker talk show is a parody of _”The Morton Downey Jr. Show” (1987) [TV-Series 1987-1989]_

 


The interior of the Franken family garage is intentionally four times as large as the exterior, as specified in the screenplay.

 


Director Cameo: [Frank Henenlotter] on the train that Frankenhooker takes to Manhattan, standing by the door holding a newspaper.

 


A family in the movie is called Shelley…after Mary Shelley, the original author of Frankenstein.

 


Writer/director Frank Henenlotter improvised the basic story at a pitch meeting. After getting the okay to make the picture, he then wrote the script for the movie.

 


Louise Lasser had just recovered from being sick and hence could hardly speak when she shot her scene talking to James Lorinz. Lasser redid all her dialogue in a post-production recording session.

 

The Brood released June 1, 1979 (CA)

The Brood

The Brood is a 1979 Canadian horror film written and directed by David Cronenberg, starring Oliver Reed, Samantha Eggar and Art Hindle. It was filmed in Toronto and Mississauga, Ontario. In 2004, one of its sequences was voted #78 among the “100 Scariest Movie Moments” by the Bravo Channel. The Brood was named 88th on the “Chicago Film Critics Association’s 100 Scariest Movies of All-Time”.  The film was Cronenberg’s first major success.


A novelization was written by Richard Starks.

Trivia:

David Cronenberg wrote the film following the tumultuous divorce and child-custody battle he waged against Margaret Hindson. Cronenberg also said that Samantha Eggar’s character, Nola Carveth, possessed some of the characteristics of his ex-wife.
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Orgy of the Dead released June 1, 1965

Orgy of the Dead

Orgy of the Dead is an unrated 1965 film directed by Stephen C. Apostolof under the alias A. C. Stephens and written by Ed Wood. It is a combination of horror and erotica, and is something of a transition for Wood, who began as a horror writer and later began writing pornography. Wood also wrote the novel of the same name.

Trivia:

The film based on the novel by Edward D. Wood Jr. has no werewolf character, like in the film. Wood received $600 for the novel.


Most prints of the film have someone’s fingerprint on the negative during the opening credits. It’s visible for only a frame, so, when the credits play, it is only seen long enough to register that something went by, but not what. Frame by frame slow down and then still reveals it’s, most likely, a print from a thumb.

 


The cape worn by Criswell as The Emperor is the same cape worn by Bela Lugosi as Count Dracula in Bud Abbott Lou Costello Meet Frankenstein (1948).

 


This film is listed among The 100 Most Amusingly Bad Movies Ever Made in Golden Raspberry Award founder John Wilson’s book THE OFFICIAL RAZZIE® MOVIE GUIDE.

 

Evil of Frankenstein

The Evil of Frankenstein is a 1963 British horror film made by Hammer Studio. Directed by Freddie Francis, the film stars Peter Cushing and New Zealand wrestler Kiwi Kingston.

The film’s version of the Monster is noted for resembling Universal Pictures’ famous Frankenstein series of the 1930s and ’40s, including the flat-headed look of Jack Pierce’s monster make-up originally designed for Boris Karloff as well as the distinctive laboratory sets. Earlier Hammer Frankenstein movies had studiously avoided such similarities for copyright reasons but a new movie distribution deal with Universal helped provide some latitude.

Trivia:

When first shown on television in 1968, some theatrical scenes were replaced by less intense scenes filmed by another director and with extra actors included.


Hammer stalwart Terence Fisher was originally slated to direct the film, but had to bow out after an automobile accident, leaving cameraman Freddie Francis at the helm.

 


In The Curse of Frankenstein (1957), Hammer were barred from copying any details from the Universal films of the 1930s and ’40s, including the famous monster make-up. This film, however, was distributed by Universal, and so Hammer had free rein to copy elements from the Universal franchise, most noticeably the creature’s make-up and the laboratory sets.

 


Howard Goorney is dubbed.

 

Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed

Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed is a British horror film directed by Terence Fisher for Hammer Film Productions in released in 1969. The cast includes Peter Cushing, Freddie Jones, Veronica Carlson and Simon Ward. The film is the fifth in a series of Hammer films centering on Dr. Frankenstein.

Trivia:

The fifth installment in Hammer Films’ Frankenstein series.


The controversial rape scene was added at the last minute, after shooting was nearly complete, because Hammer studio head Sir James Carreras thought the film lacked “sex”.

 


The characters of Insp. Frisch (Thorley Walters) and the Police Doctor were added to the script at a late stage.

 


Peter Cushing deplored the inclusion of the rape scene and even apologized to his co-star Veronica Carlson.

 

Tower of Evil released May 19, 1972

Tower of Evil 1972

Tower of Evil, also known by the title Beyond the Fog in the United States and Horror of Snape Island and Horror on Snape Island in Canada, is a 1972 British horror film. It is also known by the title of . The film is regarded by horror fans as being ahead of its time, as it crosses old world Gothic themes (dark setting, mythical superstitions, gloomy atmosphere) with many elements of the modern slasher film (elusive killer, bloody murders, sexually active characters as victims). The film was shot at Shepperton Studios in Shepperton, Surrey, England, UK in 1971.

Trivia:

Robin Askwith is dubbed.


John Hamill is dubbed.

 


Dennis Price was only required for one day.

 


The film was re-released in the US under the title “Beyond the Fog”. The reason for the new title was an attempt to capitalize on the success of John Carpenter’s horror film The Fog (1980).

 


Originally released in Britain on double bill with Hammer’s Demons of the Mind (1972).

 


For the films fiery finale stuntman Mark McBride had to be set ablaze while wearing a fire-retardant suit. While the suit protected McBride from the flames he suddenly passed out on the burning set, because the heat nearly suffocated him inside the suit. The shocked crew members rushed in and saved him.

 


Originally the character of Brent wasn’t included in the script. He was wrote in just before shooting when the studio brought in Bryant Haliday to star.

 


Star Jill Haworth was reluctant to appear in the film. In an interview with the actress she stated, “I remember in Horror of Snape Island (Tower of Evil) my character stumbles upon five dead bodies and I had to say with a straight face, ‘Oh the police aren’t going to like this’ and the crew just kept laughing every time I said it.”

 


The film was titled “Der Turm der lebenden Leichen” for its German release. Translated into English the title is “Tower of the Living Corpses”, although the film features no zombies at all. However, when the film was re-released to German theaters at the high point of the zombie craze in Germany during the early 1980s, it was re-titled “Devil’s Tower – Der Schreckensturm der Zombies” (“Terror-tower of the zombies”) and two scenes were re-dubbed, so that the actually catatonic girl from the beginning of the film speaks of zombies whenever the camera does not show her lips.

 


First released in the US on double bill with Tales of the Bizarre (1970).

 


The films Italian title “Perché il dio fenicio continua ad uccidere?” translates to “Why Does the Phoenician God Continue to Kill?”

 

Happy Birthday to Me

Happy Birthday to Me is a 1981 American slasher movie filmed in Canada & directed by J. Lee Thompson, written by John C.W. Saxton and starring Melissa Sue Anderson and Glenn Ford. It was released May 15, 1981. The film has since become something of a cult classic among fans of the slasher genre, who primarily hail it for its bizarre (and vicious) murder scenes and its twisted climactic revelation.


Trivia:

When certain cast members were stuck in their gore make-up for numerous hours, they decided to walk around the neighborhood scaring the wits out of people.


The press reported that in order to keep the “twist” ending a secret several endings were shot. This is untrue but helped hide the fact that while shooting, the film had no ending. The script was written with one ending that made sense to the story, but did not have a twist. So producers proceeded to film while tinkering with a twist. This explains why there is no build up to the ending.

 


Most ads and posters for film carried a photo of a young man about to be orally impaled with a skewer of meat and vegetables, with the slogan “John Will Never Eat Shish Kebab Again.” However, there is no character in the movie with this name.

 


Many fans were upset with the 2004 DVD release from Sony Pictures Home Entertainment because, not only did it have a completely different cover to that of the infamous original poster and VHS cover, it featured a disco score in place of the atmospheric piano piece that originally played over the opening credits in theaters and VHS releases. In 2009, Anchor Bay/Starz Home Entertainment re-released the DVD using the original poster as the cover and restoring the original music over the opening sequence.

 

Werewolf of London released May 13, 1935

Werewolf of London 1935

Werewolf of London is a 1935 Horror/werewolf movie starring Henry Hull and produced by Universal Pictures. Jack Pierce’s eerie werewolf make-up was simpler than his version six years later for Lon Chaney, Jr. in The Wolf Man but, according to film historians, remains strikingly effective as worn by Hull.

Werewolf of London was the first Hollywood mainstream werewolf movie.

Trivia:

Jack Pierce’s original werewolf design for Henry Hull was identical to the one used later in The Wolf Man, but it was rejected in favor of a minimalist approach that was less obscuring to facial expressions. Hull was unwilling to spend hours having makeup applied. The werewolf’s howl was an audio blend of Hull and a recording of an actual timber wolf, an approach which was never duplicated in any subsequent werewolf film. Also, at the beginning of the film, the supposed “Tibetan” spoken by villagers in the movie is actually Cantonese; Henry Hull is otherwise just muttering gibberish in his responses to them.

The copyright record synopsis has a scene where a boy is almost eaten by a plant in the botanical gardens sequence, and he is saved by Wilfred. It was not included in the final print.


Pre-release publicity material lists Reginald Barlow cast as “Dr. Phillips”, scripted as a specialist whom “Dr. Glendon” privately consults after being afflicted with “lycanthrophobia”; this detail, however, was bypassed in the finished production (if indeed it was ever filmed at all), most likely because it would be totally against the established “solitary” character of “Glendon” to do so. At any rate, Barlow was “re-assigned” the uncredited role of the caretaker Timothy.

 


The well-known “Wolf Man” makeup used on Lon Chaney Jr. was actually created by Universal Pictures makeup designer Jack P. Pierce for Henry Hull in this film. After makeup tests, Hull declined to wear the makeup, citing his dislike of the time-consuming makeup application. A less hairy version was then devised by Pierce, and it is this version that is seen in the film. A still photograph of the original test makeup survives, however, and has been published.

 


The “original theatrical trailer” provided as a bonus feature on the DVD is actually the re-edited 1935 trailer, with only Henry Hull and Valerie Hobson identified by name, and a Realart re-release title card prepared for the 1951 re-issue. Scenes with Warner Oland are prominently featured but his name never appears, a typical attempt to disguise the age of the film, since Oland had been dead for many years by the time it was re-released.

 


The supposed “Tibetan” spoken in the movie is actually the Cantonese dialect of Chinese. The actor is otherwise just muttering gibberish.

 


Although they play husband and wife in this film Henry Hull is 27 years older than Valerie Hobson

 


Shooting lasted from Jan. 18-Feb. 23, 1935, released June 3.

 


Part of the original SHOCK THEATER package of 52 Universal titles released to television in 1957, followed a year later with SON OF SHOCK, which added 21 more features.

 

Bride of the Monster

Bride of the Monster (originally known as Bride of the Atom) is a 1955 horror/science-fiction film starring Béla Lugosi in a traditional mad scientist role. It was produced, directed and co-written by Edward D. Wood, Jr.. A sequel, entitled Night of the Ghouls, was made in 1959, but went unreleased for decades.

Trivia:

Producer Donald E. McCoy strongly disagreed with the use of nuclear warheads. He only agreed to finance the film if Edward D. Wood Jr. rewrote his original script, and made it end with a nuclear explosion as a warning against the use of nuclear weapons.


This was Edward D. Wood Jr.’s only financially successful film upon original release.

 


When Vornoff has Janet Lawton strapped to the table, he tells her she is about to become “The Bride of the Atom”. “The Bride of the Atom” was this film’s working title.

 


Edward D. Wood Jr. credited Alex Gordon with co-writing the story and screenplay as thanks for giving him the idea. Gordon actually contributed nothing to the script.

 


The prop octopus was stolen from Republic Studios and was constructed for the John Wayne film Wake of the Red Witch (1948). The motor which controlled the octopus’ tentacles was not stolen with it, as is obvious to the casual viewer. Additionally, one of the tentacles was torn off in the process of stealing it out of the property room.

 


Stuntman Eddie Parker’s participation in this film is still debatable. The story that he doubled Bela Lugosi stems from amateur fanzines in the early 1960s, and the assumption that Parker doubled Lugosi in Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man (1943). He didn’t. Parker doubled Lon Chaney Jr. as the Wolf Man; Australian actor/stuntman Gil Perkins doubled the Monster.

 


Tony McCoy was cast in the male lead role, primarily because his father, Arizona entrepreneur Donald E. McCoy, was the owner of Packing Service Corp. (a meat packing concern), and was a major investor in the film.

 


Wood began shooting ‘Bride of the Atom’ in October, 1954 on a tiny sound stage in Los Angeles called Ted Allan Studios. He ran out of money after just three days and had to shut down production.

 


According to Paul Marco, Edward D. Wood Jr. thought that Bela Lugosi’s memory might not be very good so for Lugosi’s huge speech in Bride of the Monster, Wood had the prop man make cue cards. Lugosi, upset, insisted he didn’t need cue cards and he would “memorize it.” Wood still insisted on the cue cards telling Lugosi, “We have to be safe.” Bela Lugosi went to Paul Marco for help. He had Marco promise not to show him the cue cards during the scene. Paul Marco held the cards at his side the whole time and Lugosi never looked over once. Bela Lugosi gave a sensational performance and the whole crew got up and applauded.

 

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