The Crazies released March 16, 1973

The Crazies 1973


The Crazies (also known as Code Name: Trixie) is an American 1973 horror/action film about the effects of the accidental release of a military biological weapon upon the inhabitants of a small American town. The film was written and directed by George A. Romero, and starred Lane Carroll, Richard Liberty and Lynn Lowry.

Trivia:

  • Filmed in Evans City, Pennsylvania. Many of the movie’s bit players were locals; several of the white-suited soldiers were actually high-school students.
  • The burning house at the beginning of the film was a bit of serendipity for the film’s crew. The local fire department was burning down an old house to practice putting out the fire, and agreed to let the filmmakers set up and film the event.
  • A lot of the audio mixing in The Crazies, particularly the voices of soldiers and extras and specific sound effects, were completed in post-production in the basement of Romero’s Latent Image Studio.
  • No Hollywood stunt men were used in The Crazies. Local firemen and licensed fireworks professionals handled all of the action sequences, including the creation and employment of blood squibs.
  • The budget for The Crazies was approximately $270,000 and it was Romero’s first Union film but he also employed a lot of actors from Pittsburgh and non-professionals from Evans City and Zelienople.
  • In the opening scene, Special Effects Technician for The Crazies, Regis Survinski plays the insane father who murders his wife and torches the house. The children of Cinematographer S. William Hinzman play the terrified kids in the scene. The house was originally slated for destruction by the local fireman as a practice run and Romero got permission to film the burning of it.
  • According to George A. Romero the only problem that ever came up with the people of Evans City, where the film was being shot, was about the filming of the final scene. In the conclusion Col. Peckem has to strip down and change clothes before being lifted off by the helicopter. Some of the locals saw the scene as it was being shot and took offense to the slight of a nude man outside. Romero said lawyers had to be called in to resolve the issue.
  • In the scene where Clank is going crazy with the rifle in the woods he yells ‘another goddamn bug!’, ironically moments after a small fly can be seen landing on the upper corner of the camera lens.
  • S. William Hinzman, the films cinematographer, cameos as the local that shoots at the fed’s operation station.
  • Edith Bell, who plays the lab tech., is the wife of the film’s presenter Lee Hessel.
  • Director George A. Romero makes two cameos in the film; the first as a local being herded into the high school and the second as the head of the president of the United States seen on a monitor screen.
  • The basis of the film was a script by Romero’s friend and co-worker Paul McCollough entitled ‘The Mad People’. McCollough gave the script to Romero with his blessing to re-write it and Romero turned out a revised version of it that was made into ‘The Crazies’.

I Drink Your Blood released December 1970

I Drink Your Blood is a cult horror film originally released in 1970. The film was written and directed by David E. Durston, produced by Jerry Gross, and starred Bhaskar Roy Chowdhury and Lynn Lowry (who is uncredited in the film).

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n-vdVgiytEo]

Like many B-movies of its time, I Drink Your Blood was a Times Square exploitation film and drive-in theater staple.

Trivia:

  • The scary, ugly face seen on the movie posters for this film was originally part of the poster art for the US/British monster film, It! (1967), starring Roddy McDowall.
  • This was the first film ever to be rated X by the MPAA based on violence alone.
  • Before the passing of the Video Recordings Act, a cut version was briefly released by Media Video in the UK in the early 1980s. Although it was never listed as an official “nasty video”, it was one of the films featured on a tape compiled by outspoken critic of sex and violence Mary Whitehouse and shown at the Conservative Party conference in 1984. This film has yet to receive a UK certificate.
  • Night of Horror released October 10, 1978

    Night of Horror (1978)

    Night of Horror (1978)

    When four people are stranded on what was once an ancient battlefield, one of them is haunted by a voice from the past. As she tries to answer their call for help, a chilling nightmare unfolds… thus begins the “Night of Horror.”

    Directed by Tony Malanowski, written by Rebecca Bach, Tony Malanowski, and Gae Schmitt. Starring Rebecca Bach, Jeff Canfield, Phil Davis and Tony Malanowski.

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    Shivers (1975) released October 10, 1975

     

     

     

     

     

    David Cronenberg's Shivers (1975)

    David Cronenberg's Shivers (1975)

     

     

     

     

     

    Shivers (filmed as Orgy of the Blood Parasites; alternate titles: The Parasite Murders, They Came from Within, and Frissons for the French Canadian distribution) is a 1975 Canadian horror film written and directed by David Cronenberg. Cronenberg won “Best Director” at the 1975 Sitges Film Festival.

    Tagline: T-E-R-R-O-R beyond the power of priest or science to exorcise.

    [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hsDhtNLZQ1M]

    The film’s chaotic structure mirrors the collapse of residential life in the apartment block. The opening shows a young couple being welcomed as residents to the tower block, intercut with Dr Hobbes murdering his adolescent mistress by strangling her, then cutting open her stomach and pouring acid into her body to kill the parasites, and then cutting his own throat. Partway into the story, the audience learn the reason for Hobbes’s actions; most of Shivers consists of social set piece tableaux showing the sexual promiscuity that spreads the parasites to the other residents.

    Buy this Title

    Buy this Title

    Director Cronenberg said he identified with the residents after they were infected; and shows the swinging sterility of “normal” life mercilessly caricatured through the characterisation of the bland, rich, young professionals inhabiting the apartment block, and the hard-sell estate agent’s sales pitch from Merrick (Ronald Mlodzik), which accompanies the opening titles.

    Shivers was Cronenberg’s first feature film, and was the most profitable Canadian film made to date in 1975, but was so controversial that the Canadian parliament debated its social and artistic value and effect upon society, because of a conservative magazine movie reviewer’s objection to its sexual and violent content.

    Trivia:

  • According to Lynn Lowry, the shoulder that Nurse Forsythe stabs with the fork is actually that of David Cronenberg. A pad was inserted under Cronenberg’s shirt for Lowry to stab, but, unfortunately, she missed and hit Cronenberg’s real shoulder instead.
  • Susan Petrie was unable to cry, so David Cronenberg used onions to help her produce tears. This worked, but the camera was out of focus when the scene was shot, and because Cronenberg was out of onions, Petrie gave her consent to let him to slap her on the face. He did so until her face was numb from all the takes. He finally settled for a series of takes he found to be less than satisfactory.
  • Canadian journalist Robert Fulford attacked the content of “Shivers” in the pages of the national magazine “Saturday Night.” Since Cronenberg’s film was partially financed by the taxpayer-funded National Film Board of Canada (or NFB), Fulford headlined the article “You Should Know How Bad this Movie Is: You Paid for It.” Not only did this high-profile attack make it more difficult for Cronenberg to obtain funding for his subsequent movies, Cronenberg later said that Fulford’s attack also resulted in him being kicked out of his Toronto apartment.
  • This film was shot in fifteen days.
  • David Cronenberg cast Lynn Lowry as Nurse Forsythe because of her haunting eyes and strange screen presence.
  • shivers_poster

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