Blood of Dracula’s Castle was released October 5th 1969

Tagline: ONCE THE GATE CLOSES YOU’LL NEVER GET OUT!

Blood of Dracula’s Castle poster

27x40 Movie Poster!

Plot outline: Count Dracula (Alexander D’Arcy) and his vampire wife (Paula Raymond), hiding behind pseudonyms, lure girls to their castle in the Arizona desert to be drained of blood by their butler George (John Carradine), who then mixes real bloody marys for the couple. Then the real owners of the castle show up, along with Johnny, who is a serial killer or a werewolf depending on which version you watch. The owners refuse to sell, so Dracula wants to force them to sell..

Directed by
Al Adamson
Jean Hewitt

Cast – in credits order (verified as complete)
Alexander D’Arcy … Count Dracula, alias Count Charles Townsend
Paula Raymond … Countess Townsend
Gene O’Shane … Glen Cannon
Barbara Bishop … Liz Arden
Robert Dix … Johnny
John Carradine … George, the butler
Ray Young … Mango
Vicki Volante … Ann, motorist-victim
John Cardos
Ken Osborne

Make Up Department
Jean Hewitt … makeup artist
Kenny Osborne … special makeup effects

Alexander D'Arcy and Paula Raymond

Alexander D'Arcy and Paula Raymond

By the late 1960’s, the fledging film production company Independent International had already begun to make a name for itself in the exploitation film market. While partners Sam Sherman and Al Adamson only had one feature to their credit at this point, Satan’s Sadists had come in on the cutting edge of the new violent biker movie trend that was currently sweeping the drive-in theater circuit. Hoping to cash in on the always popular horror genre, Adamson had procured a story treatment called Feast of the Vampires and writer Rex Carlton was brought in to translate the tale of cannibal vampires into a screenplay. The finished film may not have retained much of the original story but it did prove to be one of director Adamson’s most coherent productions and a popular item in theaters and on television for many years to come. Sadly, Blood of Dracula’s Castle would also end up being a black eye for Independent International and a source of financial disappointment

On a meager budget estimated to be around $60,000, Sherman and Adamson were able to secure both an excellent location and an impressive cast. Shea Castle (also known as Sky Castle) was built in the Southern California desert near Del Sur by a real estate tycoon in the early 1920’s. The imposing structure was modeled after medieval Irish castles and came complete with a lake and its own private air strip. Tales of supernatural phenomenon still surround the site and at least one death by suicide has been confirmed within its walls. It was at this architectural curiosity that Adamson assembled his equally curious cast of veteran actors and members of his ever growing repertory company.

Barbara Bishop and John Carradine

Barbara Bishop and John Carradine

Alex D’Arcy (Horrors of Spider Island) and Paula Raymond (Beast From 20,000 Fathoms), both of whose long careers were nearly at an end, were cast as Count and Countess Townsend (aka Dracula). Robert Dix (Forbidden Planet) played the psychopath Johnny who in some versions of the film even turns out to be a werewolf! At the last minute, veteran horror actor John Carradine was added for name value and (mis)cast as George the butler. While Carradine makes everything he can out of a throwaway role, it seems almost impossible that he could appear in this film at all and NOT play Dracula! The remaining cast, including Gene O’Shea, Barbara Bishop, and Vicki Volante all give performances in excess of the film’s low budget. This combination of cast and location made it look like there was far more on the screen than the cost conscious Independent International had really spent.

Blood of Dracula’s Castle is the tale of modern day vampires, who may be the original Count and Countess Dracula, living in an isolated desert castle. To survive, they capture young women who are chained in their dungeon basement and drained of their blood through the most modern of techniques. At some point in history, the Draculas apparently became mixed up with the cult of the moon goddess Luna. Whenever things get boring around the castle, they sacrifice one of their blood slaves with the help of their butler George, who just happens to be a high priest! Also on hand for laughs are Mango the mute hunchback and Johnny the recently escaped homicidal killer/werewolf. Things get complicated when a young couple inherit the castle and decide they want to evict the current tenants and live there themselves. By the end of the film the vampires, who seem a little too civilized for their own good, and their associates are dispatched and the young heroes are left to ponder if they really want to live in a castle out in the middle of the desert after all.

Director Al Adamson manages to infuse some unique and unconventional touches that give the film a charm all its own. The vampires only drink blood from wine glasses after their butler has extracted it from their victims with a large syringe. When they meet their end by turning to dust in the light of the sun, the Count and Countess turn into bats and fly off into the castle. The final moments of the film are a Mango-fest as the hulking brute is shot, hit with an axe, set on fire, AND shoved off a cliff! Hopefully actor Ray Young got a bonus for that days work!

Unfortunately after the film was completed it became locked in legal turmoil. The financial backers had this film and another one, Nightmare in Wax starring an eye patched Cameron Mitchell as a demented artist, in production at the same time. When Nightmare ran into financial problems with the lab that the backers could not resolve it was trapped in legal limbo. Blood of Dracula’s Castle had been cross collateralized with Nightmare in the finance arrangement so it was stuck too. A distributor called Crown International eventually paid off the lab costs and obtained the rights to both films which they played on a very successful double bill. Independent International lost all rights to the picture and spent years competing against their own product for drive-in rentals.

After a long and successful theatrical run, the film was syndicated to television by two different companies in two different versions. One version, from Crown International, is the same as the one they distributed to theaters and the character of Johnny is just an ordinary psychopath with a fixation on the moon. In the other version, credited to Paragon International Pictures, the distributors apparently decided their weren’t enough monsters in the mash so Johnny actually turned out to be a werewolf! To accomplish this, they filmed some additional scenes of an actor in a Don Post werewolf mask killing a prison guard and chasing a woman through the woods. The new footage doesn’t exactly make sense because the werewolf beats the guard to death with a club and in the chase scene he is wearing his prison uniform again even though by this point Johnny has stolen clothes and reached the castle where he apparently keeps a full wardrobe. Later in the film, Johnny doesn’t turn into a werewolf during the full moon sacrifice he participates in and is subsequently killed with a regular bullet! These dueling versions kept young horror in fans

Source(s) CrazedFanBoy.com, Wikipedia

amazon-dvd-bestsellers

www.goremaster.com_black

Making Movie Magic: K.N.B. EFX Group

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a8GHdIx8sGE] 

K.N.B. EFX Group background:

In 1988, Robert Kurtzman along with Gregory Nicotero and Howard Berger, formed K.N.B. EFX Group, a special effects studio which has gone on to work on over 600 film and television projects. K.N.B. has won numerous awards, including an Emmy Award in 2001 for their work on the 2000 Sci Fi Channel miniseries Frank Herbert’s Dune.  They were awarded an Academy Award in 2006 for achievement in makeup for The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe.

In 2002, Kurtzman left K.N.B. EFX Group. Kurtzman and his wife, relocated their family to Crestline, Ohio, and started their own production company, Precinct 13 Entertainment. Founded in 2003, Precinct 13 is described as a Film/Television and Radio Commercial/Visual Effects production facility.

From the current K.N.B. website: http://www.knbefxgroup.com/

Transformers, Pulp Fiction, Dances with Wolves, Land of the Dead, The Green Mile, Sin City, Spy Kids, The Chronicles of Narnia, Army of Darkness; The Island….These aren’t merely the names of great genre films; they’re iconic interpretations of some of the most imaginative and groundbreaking special makeup effects ever created.  KNB EFX Group is the force behind some of the most memorable effects put on film.  With work on over 600 films, including 5 Oscar winners, and dozens of awards; including an Oscar of their own, one Emmy, one BAFTA award, and a whole host of Saturn’s, KNB is the culmination of two decades of creative passion for making real what was previously unreal and unimagined.  Over the last 20 years, Greg Nicotero and Howard Berger’s company has grown and matured within the ever changing landscape of makeup and creature effects.  KNB’s principal philosophy has remained consistent: deliver ground breaking visually spectacular EFX while breathing life into the illusion of what is seen on the screen.

K.N.B. EFX Group Howard Berger and Gregory Nicotero

K.N.B. EFX Group Howard Berger and Gregory Nicotero

 

GoreMaster.com

David Soul Birthday – August 28

 

David Soul

David Soul

David Soul

(born 28 August 1943) is an American actor and singer, best known for his role as the California police Det. Kenneth “Hutch” Hutchinson in the television program Starsky and Hutch (1975-79). He became a British citizen in 2004.

Soul first gained attention as the mysterious “Covered Man” on several appearances on The Merv Griffin Show in 1967, in which he sang while wearing a ski mask and explained: “My name is David Soul, and I want to be known for my music.”  The same year, he made his film debut in The Secret Sharer.

Soul then appeared as level-headed Joshua Bolt on the television program Here Come the Brides, and later, Arthur Hill’s law partner on Owen Marshall: Counselor at Law. Superstar status came when he portrayed Det. Ken “Hutch” Hutchinson on Starsky and Hutch, a role he played from 1975-79. He has also made guest appearances on shows such as I Dream of Jeannie, McMillan and Wife, Cannon, Gunsmoke, All in the Family, the TV miniseries World War III, Star Trek, and The Streets of San Francisco. Soul also appeared in the lead role in the TV mini-series Salem’s Lot, based on the novel of the same name by Stephen King (1979). In films, Soul played in the 1971 film Johnny Got His Gun, but his best known film appearance was opposite Clint Eastwood in Magnum Force (1973).David_Soul_

Soul had successful singing career, including hits such as “Don’t Give Up on Us” and “Silver Lady”.  

Soul continued to make guest appearances in various US television series, with the occasional small film role. He starred as the infamous Florida robber Michael Platt in the TV film In the Line of Duty: The FBI Murders (1988), which depicted the 1986 FBI Miami shootout.  In the mid 1990s, Soul moved to London, forging a new career on the West End stage.  September 2004, he became a British citizen. He has also kept his US citizenship and ties with the US. 

In August 2008, Soul appeared in the reality TV talent show-themed television series Maestro on BBC Two.

 [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aIbJ2rQ59ZE]

Salem's Lot 1979

Salem's Lot 1979

 Make Up Department
  Bette Iverson … hair stylist
  Ben Lane … makeup artist
  Jack H. Young … special makeup effects

Special Effects Department
  Frank Torro … special effects

www.goremaster.com_black

 

David Naughton & Griffin Dunne

David Naughton & Griffin Dunne

 

An American Werewolf in London is a 1981 American-British comedy/horror film, written and directed by John Landis. It stars David Naughton, Griffin Dunne, and Jenny Agutter. The movie won the 1981 Saturn Award for Best Horror Film and an Academy Award for Outstanding Achievement in Makeup. The film was one of three high-profile werewolf films released in 1981, alongside The Howling and Wolfen. Over the years, the film has accumulated a cult following and has been referred to as a cult classic.

Tagline: John Landis – the director of Animal House brings you a different kind of animal.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m3FTkAS15zk]

Rick Baker

Rick Baker

Blending the macabre with a wicked sense of humor, director John Landis (National Lampoon’s Animal House) delivers a contemporary take on the classic werewolf tale in this story of two American tourists who, while traveling in London, find their lives changed forever when a viscious wolf attacks them during a full moon. Featuring groundbreaking, Academy Award-winning make-up by Rick Baker (The Wolfman).

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZogmO2aqQq0]

The film was followed by a 1997 sequel, An American Werewolf in Paris, which featured a completely different cast and none of the original crew.

John Landis

John Landis

John Landis came up with the story while he worked in Yugoslavia as a production assistant on the film Kelly’s Heroes. He and a Yugoslavian member of the crew were driving in the back of a car on location when they came across a group of gypsies. The gypsies appeared to be performing rituals on a man being buried so that he would not “rise from the grave.” This made Landis realize that he could never be able to confront the undead and gave him the idea for a film in which a man of his own age would go through such a thing.

John Landis wrote the first draft of An American Werewolf in London in 1969 and shelved it for over a decade. Two years later, Landis wrote, directed and starred in his debut film, Schlock, which developed a cult following. Landis developed box-office status in Hollywood through the successful comedy films The Kentucky Fried Movie, National Lampoon’s Animal House and The Blues Brothers before securing $10

Beware of the Moon

Beware of the Moon

million financing for his werewolf film. Financiers believed that Landis’ script was too frightening to be a comedy and too funny to be a horror film.

Michael Jackson cited this film as his reason for working with Landis on his subsequent music videos, including Thriller and Black or White.

The various prosthetics and fake, robotic body parts used during the film’s painful, extended werewolf transformation scenes and on Griffin Dunne when his character returns as a bloody, mangled ghost impressed the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences so much that they decided to create a new awards category at the Oscars specifically for the film – Outstanding Achievement in Makeup. Since the 1981 Academy Awards, this has been a regular category each year. During the body casting sessions, the crew danced around David Naughton singing, “I’m a werewolf, you’re a werewolf…wouldn’t you like to be a werewolf, too” in reference to his days as a pitchman for Dr Pepper.

Blueray DVD

Blueray DVD

In-Jokes:

  • The film was produced by Lycanthrope Productions, a lycanthrope being a person with the power to turn himself into a wolf.
  • The film’s ironically upbeat songs all refer in some way to the moon such as: Bobby Vinton’s slow and soothing version of “Blue Moon”, which plays during the opening credits, Van Morrison’s “Moondance” as David and Alex make love for the first time, Creedence Clearwater Revival’s “Bad Moon Rising” as David is nearing the moment of changing to the werewolf, a soft, bittersweet ballad version of “Blue Moon” by Sam Cooke during the agonizing wolf transformation and The Marcels’ doo-wop version of “Blue Moon” over the end credits. Landis failed to get permission to use Cat Stevens’ “Moonshadow” and Bob Dylan’s “Moonshiner”, both artists feeling the film to be inappropriate. It was stated on the DVD commentary by David Naughton and Griffin Dunne that they were not sure why Landis could not get the rights to Warren Zevon’s “Werewolves of London” – a song that would have been more appropriate for the film (perhaps Landis dismissed the song on the grounds that it didn’t have the word “moon” in the title).
  • Landis’ signature in-joke of the fictitious film See You Next Wednesday can be seen when the werewolf runs rampant in Piccadilly Circus, playing at the porn cinema and as a poster in the London Underground train station where Gerald Bringsley is attacked by the werewolf.
  • References to the film have appeared in many of Landis’ other films and most notably in Michael Jackson’s Thriller as the sounds of Jackson transforming into a werewolf are from the film.
  • Although not part of this film, in the Masters of Horror episode entitled “Deer Woman”, directed and co-written by Landis, when the protagonist mentions “a series of freak wolf attacks in London in 1981″, a brief but clear reference to An American Werewolf in London. According to its trading card insert, “‘Deer Woman’ is a very much a part of An American Werewolf in London canon.”
  • American werewolf cinema scene

    Cameos and Bit Parts:

    In the Piccadilly Circus sequence, the man hit by a car and thrown through a store window, is Landis himself.

    As in most of the director’s movies, Frank Oz makes an appearance: first as Mr. Collins from the American embassy in the hospital scene, and later as Miss Piggy in a dream sequence, when David’s younger siblings watch a scene from The Muppet Show that was never shown in the United States.

    Actors in bit parts who were already – or would become – more well-known include the two chess players David and Jack meet in the pub, played by the familiar character actor Brian Glover and then-rising comedian and actor Rik Mayall. One of the policemen helping to chase and kill the werewolf is John Altman, who would later achieve fame as “Nasty” Nick Cotton in EastEnders.   Alan Ford – later to appear in Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels and Snatch – plays a taxi driver. The policeman in the cinema is played by John Salthouse and the policeman in Piccadilly Circus is played by Peter Ellis. Both Salthouse and Ellis appeared in police drama The Bill.

    A radio adaptation of the film was broadcast on BBC Radio 1 in 1997, written and directed by Dirk Maggs and with Jenny Agutter, Brian Glover, and John Woodvine reprising the roles of Alex Price, the chess player (now named George Hackett, and with a more significant role as East Proctor’s special constable) and Dr. Hirsch. The roles of David and Jack were played by Eric Meyers and William Dufris.  Maggs’ script added a backstory that some people in East Proctor are settlers from Eastern Europe and brought lycanthropy with them. The werewolf who bites David is revealed to be related to Hackett, and has escaped from an asylum where he is held under the name “Larry Talbot”, the name of the title character in The Wolf Man.

    Movie Poster 27x40

    Movie Poster 27x40

     

    Make Up Department
      Elaine Baker … makeup effects crew
      Rick Baker … special makeup effects
      Doug Beswick … makeup effects crew
      Kevin Brennan … makeup effects crew
      Robin Grantham … makeup artist
      Tom Hester … makeup effects crew
      Steve Johnson … makeup effects assistant
      Beryl Lerman … makeup artist
      Shawn McEnroe … makeup effects crew
      Joseph Ross … makeup effects crew
      Bill Sturgeon … makeup effects crew
      Craig Reardon … makeup effects crew (uncredited)

    an_american_werewolf_in_london_eyes 

    Special Effects Department
      Neil Corbould … special effects assistant
      Martin Gutteridge … special effects
      Garth Inns … special effects

    Lost Boys released July 31, 1987

    lostboys_KieferSutherland

    Kiefer Sutherland

    Strange events threaten an entire family when two brothers move with their divorced mother to a California town where the local teenage gang turns out to be a pack of vampires.

     

     

    AlexWinter-marco-LostBoys

    Alex Winter

    Tagline: Sleep all day. Party all night. Never grow old. Never die. It’s fun to be a vampire.

    Starring: Jason Patric, Kiefer Sutherland, Corey Haim, Dianne Wiest, Edward Herrmann, Barnard Hughes, Jami Gertz, and Corey Feldman. Directed by Joel Schumacher

    [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hsv_NQFbQzo]

    Won the SATURN award for “Best Horror Film” in 1988.

    Lost Boys

    Jason Patric

    Jason Patric

    Won the 1988 Young Artist Award for Best Young Actor in a Horror Motion Picture: Corey Feldman and Teenage Favorite Horror/Drama Motion Picture.

     

     

     

     

    Make Up Department
      Brent Baker … effects crew: Cannom
      Everett Burrell … effects crew: Cannom
      Greg Cannom … prosthetic effects: vampires
      Keith Edmier … effects crew: Cannom
      Earl Ellis … effects crew: Cannom
      Bill Foertsch … effects crew: Cannom
      Dino Ganziano … hair stylist
      Chris Goehe … effects crew: Cannom
      Morton K. Greenspoon, O.D. … contact lens consultant
      Steve Laporte … makeup artist
      Ve Neill … makeup artist
      Larry Odien … effects crew: Cannom
      K. G. Ramsey … hair stylist
      John Vulich … effects crew: Cannom

     Special Effects Department
      Donald Elliott … special effects
      Sam Marquez … special effects
      Timothy J. Moran … special effects
      Doyle Smiley … special effects
      Bob Stoker … special effects
      Lucinda Strub … special effects
      Richard W. Stutsman … special effects
      Matt Sweeney … special effects coordinator
      Fred Tassaro … special effects foreman
      Michael Wever … special effects
      Tony Gardner … special makeup effects artist: Greg Cannom’s crew (uncredited)
      D. Kerry Prior … special effects artist: Dream Quest Images (uncredited)
      Shamu … special effects technician (uncredited)

    Lost Boys Poster 24 X 36

    Lost Boys Poster 24 X 36

    Friday the 13th Part 8: Jason Takes Manhattan

    Friday the 13th Part 8: Jason Takes Manhattan

    A passing boat bound for new york pulls jason along for the ride. Look out new york here comes hell in a hockey mask.

    [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RBPr8v-hptI]

    Tagline: I LOVE NY [heart symbol in the shape of a bloodied ice hockey mask denotes love]

    Friday the 13th part 8

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Make Up Department
      Susan Boyd … key hair stylist
      Jamie Brown … special makeup effects
      Laurie Finstad … makeup artist
      Bill Terezakis … special makeup effects artist
      Francesca von Zimmermann … assistant makeup artist
      Francesca von Zimmermann … special makeup effects artist

    Special Effects Department
      Martin Becker … mechanical effects
      Barbara Anne Bock … special effects assistant
      Scott Coulter … special effects makeup
      Jim Gill … special effects coordinator
      Bettie Kauffman … special effects coordinator
      James Goff Martin … special effects assistant director
      Gary Paller … special effects coordinator
      Maureen Grundle Preddy … special effects costumes
      Brenton Spencer … special effects photography

    Visual Effects Department
      Jim Danforth … optical effects
      Michael F. Hoover … miniature artist
      Shelly Morrow … animation camera
      Shelly Morrow … opticals

    Friday the 13th Part 8

    27 x 40 Movie Poster!

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Get the latest DVD here!

    Get the latest DVD here! (Deluxe Edition)

    DVD Features:
    * Commentary: – Killer Commentary by writer/director Rob Hedden and actors Jensen Daggett and Kane Hodder
    * New York Has A New Problem – The Making of Friday the 13th Part VIII: Jason Takes Manhattan
    * Gag Reel
    * Slashed Scenes

     These are two of the most amazing transformation scenes on film!  The two titans of practical makeup special effects at the time Rick Baker and Rob Bottin created these amazing effects.

    [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oMl1qGkfyv0]

    As far as the films I thought both were great but I enjoyed the humor more in An American Werewolf in London — along with the two stars David Naughton and Griffin Dunne…two of my all time favorites! 

    An American Werewolf in London was released August 21, 1981

     

    Tagline: John Landis - the director of Animal House brings you a different kind of animal.

    Tagline: John Landis - the director of Animal House brings you a different kind of animal.

    Plot: 

    Two American students are on a walking tour of England and are attacked by a Werewolf. One is killed, the other is mauled. The Werewolf is killed, but reverts to it’s human form, and the townspeople are able to deny it’s existence. The surviving student begins to have nightmares of hunting on 4 feet at first, but then finds that his friend and other recent victims appear to him, demanding that he find a way to die to release them from their curse, being trapped between worlds because of their unnatural death. Written by John Vogel {jlvogel@comcast.net}

    Makeup Department
    Elaine Baker …. makeup effects crew
    Rick Baker …. special makeup effects
    Doug Beswick …. makeup effects crew
    Kevin Brennan …. makeup effects crew
    Robin Grantham …. makeup artist
    Tom Hester …. makeup effects crew
    Steve Johnson …. makeup effects assistant
    Beryl Lerman …. makeup artist
    Shawn McEnroe …. makeup effects crew
    Joseph Ross …. makeup effects crew
    Bill Sturgeon …. makeup effects crew
    Craig Reardon …. makeup effects crew (uncredited)
     
    Special Effects by
    Neil Corbould …. special effects assistant
    Martin Gutteridge …. special effects
    Garth Inns …. special effects

    The Howling was released on April 10 , 1981

    Plot: There is a serial killer on the loose, Karen White is the only reporter he communicates with. After a near fatal encounter with him at an adult video store, she is ordered to take a vacation. Eddie was killed by Police, but Karen doesn’t want to let it go and discovers that he came from a tiny community in the woods and that’s where she decides to vacation with husband Bill. Big mistake, because Eddie was an outcast of a pack of Werewolves who is trying to keep a low profile and doesn’t want any interviews. Can Karen and Bill escape the village of the wolf? Written by Chris

    learn make upeffects

    Tagline:  Imagine your worst fear a reality

    Tagline: Imagine your worst fear a reality

     

    Makeup Department
    Rick Baker …. special makeup effects consultant
    Joe Beserra …. makeup effects studio artist
    Rob Bottin …. special makeup effects creator
    Greg Cannom …. special makeup effects artist
    Bill Davis …. assistant makeup artist
    Tina Kline …. contact lens technician (as Tina Klein)
    Shawn McEnroe …. first makeup effects assistant
    Medusah …. assistant hair stylist (as Anne Aulenta-Spira)
    Medusah …. assistant makeup artist (as Anne Aulenta-Spira)
    Art Pimentel …. second makeup effects assistant
    Margaret Prentice …. makeup effects studio artist (as Margaret Beserra)
    Josephine Turner …. special hair work
    Josephine Turner …. wig maker
    Gigi Williams …. hair stylist
    Gigi Williams …. makeup artist
    Steve LaPorte …. special makeup effects artist (uncredited)
    Bill Sturgeon …. creature effects crew (uncredited) 
    Special Effects by
    Doug Beswick …. special mechanical effects
    Kevin Brennan …. special effects makeup
    Roger George …. special effects
    Morton Greenspoon …. creative contact lens effects (as Morton K. Greenspoon)
    Jeff Shank …. effects unit line producer
    Steve Shank …. effects unit line producer   
    Visual Effects by
    Dave Allen …. stop motion animation (as David Allen)
    Peter Kuran …. love scene and main title animation: Visual Concept Engineering
    Mike Warren …. optical effects
    Pam Vick …. cel animator (uncredited)

    GoreMaster Book